Archives for category: Cooking

From our mangy prune tree we saved quite a load of prunes this year.

The bees and wasps and other bugs were there first and got probably half of the crop (good for them), but we got plenty. Alas, we managed to not get stung,

We cleaned and pitted them and made them into jam.

It’s put into containers then into the freezer.

For the rest of the year.

Sweet basil gets alot of protection and watering this year of the long hot summer and is growing like never before.

One of my favorite herbs, I need a lot. Along with thyme and oregano, it makes up my version of the herbs of provence, which I use it in my herb miso as well as a score of other recipes.

Yesterday was a hot day – too hot to work in the garden. Instead we went to a farm auction nearby.

Alot of big machines

Non that I needed. My big prize was this wire work/art.

I suppose it’s an egg basket for holding eggs in boiling water.

Happy Easter

The last of the pumpkins are looking pretty bad these days.

But not bad enough that we can’t make a delicious pumpkin miso soup for Easter dinner.

I’ve always called it hardtack, but really it’s called crispbread.

This weekend we were at a get-together in Sundsvall to make some holiday treats. Besides candles, cookies and bread we made some hardtack (or crispbread or soft thinbread or whatever).

It was at an large old house with a big brick oven fired up for baking.

We made 1 batch of wheat flour soft thinbread.

And a batch of rye crispbread (knäkebröd)

The hardtack was delicious, and it was great fun baking.

The Toyoko Inn Hotel, adjacent to the Nagoya Airport, with the Dali Rhino in the entrance courtyard, was the last step in our Japan trip. 


It has an excellent japanese style breakfast,


complete with rice, vegetables, miso soup, pickles, natto and what else -Coffee!

We landed at Nagoya Airport and spent the good part of the rest of the day getting to Kyoto by slow bus which gave us another different view of Japan. 

After checking in at the ryokan, we spend the rest of the day killing time and jet lag at the Kyoto train station, one of the modern archetectural wonders of the world. 


And had dinner at our favorite restaurant there. Something I’ve been longing for since we discovered it 3 years sgo. 


Tempura on rice, miso soup, pickles and bancha tea. 

It’s gone about 6 months since I made my first ever rye miso. One batch was a sweet miso – more rye koji, less salt and less time. I have opened it and  tasted it. 

And made a vegetable soup with it. 


Nice color and smell. It was, of course, a bit weak because of the short fermentaion time, but very tasty. It had the sweet-sour flavor of a good sweet miso, and the umame effect was great. Ot will be interesting to see and taste the development of the 1 year and 2 year miso versions. When the time comes. 

The other day I boiled some soybeans for making 2 trial versions of rye miso that I can taste earlier. But I messed up and slightly toasted them in the end. Everything has to be perfect for this test, so I couldn’t use the beans. But they weren’t bad enough to throw away either. 


So, while a new batch of beans are cooking, I can use these to make some soy patties. 

Mix in onions


Herbs and salt


Oat meal and and whatever other stuff is desired


Mix and grind


Fry patties



Eat them


And finally, freeze in the leftovers. 


Koji ambrosia

First make amazake. Boil brown rice with no salt until soft and gooey. Add rice koji. Mix and keep warm, 50 – 60 degrees C for about 12 hours. The koji enzymes break the rice down – in particular, the starch into sugars. The result is the sweet pudding amazake. 

To make koji ambrosia add grated ginger, lemon peel, more liquid if neccessary, mix until smooth with a mixer and warm a little. 

The first time I tasted this was in Japan almost half a century ago. We sat in a circle on the floor and passed a bowl of warm spiced amazake around. I thought I must be in heaven and this the drink of the gods. 

I was hooked!