We made a bunch more timchi (kimchi) of the sauerkraut type.

I’m runing out of fermentation jars (they’re all full), and I couldn’t find any the right size to buy, so I had to get one of my abandoned stoneware crocks out.

We are planning for a Fermentation Day in Uppsala, the second of March, at H├ąga, with market, workshops, talks, demonstrations, cafe etc. The crock full of timchi will be a nice eye catcher for my market stall.

More information about the Fermentation Day will be posted later. Or contact me with questions.

Another batch of rye miso.

The 2 on the left are from today made with dark rye koji. The ones on the right I made a few days ago with light rye koji.

The light koji is made with starter from Higuchi Shoten Japan, and the darker with starter from Gem Cultures USA. It will be interesting to see how they progress and taste 2 years from now and to compare this with a similar test I set up earlier last spring with 2 batches of barley miso.

While recuperating I can continue making miso. Today it’s a rye miso made with light rye koji.

There is still some koji from last spring, but soon I’ll get into making this years koji.

Wonderful for skiing. But I’ve had a hernia operation and will have to take it easy. No skiing this year unless it lasts until march. I’ll be ready for the garden anyway.

Someones been messing around in the compost!

It looks like it could be the wild pigs visiting, but Farmer Ericsson and I have inspected and not found any pig tracks but lots of deer tracks. Thats good news! For now anyway.

A miso batch a week. This week a barley miso.

I plan to make 10 batches this season. Most of it for the markets.

Happy new year – this years first miso is a standard two year miso.

In other words the first miso for 2021.

I bought some more carrots and in a couple of weeks they started wilting. The best way to keep carrots is to ferment them.

10 kilos this time but still not enough. I’ll have to make another batch before gardening begins, so that I have a good supply until the fall harvest.

Somewhat ephemeral

I was raking leaves around the big oak tree next to our house yesterday and discovered that it has taken some wind in the last storm.

It’s been leaning for many years because it is situated up against bed rock, so it doesn’t have any deep roots on one side. We’ve been watching it the last couple of years. Now Alfrida (the storm) has loosened it even more.

It seems a little too precarious now, so we have decided it has to come down soon in a controlled manner.

This will leave a big hole in the landscape and in our hearts. A tragedy.

In the meantime Farmer Ericsson and neighbors have been here and stabilized it with heavyduty chains to a nearby tree, because a new storm is brewing, until a tree doctor can come and take it down gracefully.