Archives for posts with tag: Chickpeas

The mix was a bit dry this time. It usually fills these 2 jars all the way to the top or more. I obviously didn’t have as much boiling liquid left with the cooked beans as I should have. I should have added more liquid before grinding and mixing, but instead I added a deciliter of salt water to the top of each jar. I hope it soaks in. If not, I’ll get some tasty chickpea tamari.

I also started to measure things, like the water content after cooking, so I can compare with later batches in order to find an optimal weight after boiling. This time it was 1.3 kilos water.

Another chickpea miso.

I had a bag of 900 grams rice koji and 400 grams of chickpeas, so all I needed was to get 500 grams more chickpeas and weigh up 414 grams salt, and I would have a 90% miso – 90% of the standard recipe.

Chickpea miso has sailed up as a good seller. It’s gluten free, soy free, and it has a very good flavor.

Chickpea miso is very tasty.

It’s soybean free made with well cooked and ground chickpeas.

Using rice koji makes it gluten free as well.

I use the same standard recipe as for other 2 year misos. That is; 1 kilo beans, 1 kilo koji and 460 grams seasalt (well 459 grams).

With cooking water that makes nearly 5 kilos mix to ferment 2 years.

This time I cooked a kilo of chickpeas for 4 hours.

And made this along with rice koji and salt.

And here’s some I made 2 years ago. Ready for the market.

I made some test miso 2 years ago using chickpeas, and it turned out great. I must make more. I use the standard recipe for rice miso replacing soybeans with chickpeas that are boiled 2 hours instead of the 4 hours for soybeans. 



Grind and mix everything. 


Then into jars for 2 year fermentation. 

One of my customers said that she can’t eat miso because she is allergic to soy, so I said that I would try to make some chickpea miso. Here it is;

20140619-195606-71766920.jpg
I used my standard rice miso recipe but replaced soybeans with chickpeas. I soaked and cooked the chickpeas 2 instead of 4 hours. Then, when cooled, divided them into two batches, so I could make a 1 year and a 2 year miso.

20140619-200008-72008757.jpg
We only have to wait 1 year to find out if it is good. If it is, I’ll continue to make small batches and gradually adjust the recipe to optimize it for the different nutrient structure of chickpeas.

I tried making miso with yellow peas several years ago, but nobody liked it, including myself, so I have stuck to soybeans since then.