Archives for posts with tag: Compost

It was cold, wet and muddy, but, as in previous years, a group of students from CEMUS (Uppsala University Department for Sustainable Development) came out for a work day in the garden and got a lot of work done, like picking pumpkins and tomatoes before the frost gets them



Cabbage for a big batch of sauerkraut. 


Moving a couple of trees


Fixing the compost piles

And much more. 

After the good, hard, work, we retired to the kitchen to warm up and dry out with pumpkin soup and lively discussions. 


I made this jar of cucumber pickles last week. I didn’t notice that the rubber sealing ring broke, a lot of air flowed in and within a week the the mold grew profusely into a fluffy covering. If it had been a tiny bit of mold I could take it off, put on a new rubber ring and let it continue fermenting, but this is too much, and out to the compost it goes. My compost will love it!

A few days ago a project group from Uppsala University came out to take part of some spring activities in the garden. 


In spite of the less than conducive weather, we got a lot done, like getting the pumpkin patch ready – harvesting some winter survivors, weeding, spreading compost and tilling. 



We also started a new compost pile in the empty space. 

In the other crop circles we planted potatoes and made raised beds into which we put in leeks and onions and carrot seeds.

A little bit of everything. 

And here’s their video

https://vimeo.com/217929927

Except for the one that will become the pumpkin patch, all the crop circles are prepared for spring – that is – covered with a layer of compost and then rototilled. 

The weather has been fairly warm (along with the intermittent wind, snow flurries and frosty nights), so I have started to make beds and sow a few rows of the hardy vegetables – right on schedule. 


The cages are place holders for beds where cabbages will be planted out later. 

The compost is out on 3 of the 4 crop circles. 


One more pile for the pumpkin patch can go out later in may. 


Then there are 4 piles left to ferment for another year. And now a new one is started. I’ll make 4 during this season – 1 for each of the crop circles 2 years from now. 

The compost pile has been sitting around fermenting for about 2 years now, 


and the vegetable dirt needs some nourishing. 


The CEMUS students were here again for the annual field trip, getting their hands dirty. 


We harvested the last pumpkins and cleaned out the green house.




And the pumpkin patch



And with the scraps, pumpkin, maize and tomato plants, manure, black dirt and other stuff, we made 3 compost piles. 


As usual, we got a lot of important autumn work done. 

And, of course, the traditional fika started the day off and pumpkin soup finished it. 

Students from all over the world come to CEMUS – the institution for  the studies of sustainable development at Uppsala University. 

And we welcome a group of students each term to come here and experience ecological garden work. This time Sweden, Finland, Germany, New Zealand and Cambodia were represented. 

We harvested all the pumpkins on monday after a few frosty nights with more frost to come. 


Today I remembered that I’d better get the volunteers still out on the compost piles. 

Quite a harvest;

I don’t know where the seeds came from, because I’ve never grown the orange stripy kind. Must be from some hybrids. Usually I don’t care much for the compost volunteers because these wild ones don’t get as good a flavor as the hybrids. But these are so beautiful that I can sell them as great ornimentals – and food. 

I made a pumpkin miso soup with one the other day and it was quite good. 

I’m now spreading compost on the vegetable growing crop circles. 

  
  

 Garden and kitchen refuse, manure, dirt, leaves etc. undergo a two year fermentation. It is now ready. 

   

We finally got a covering of snow – blue in the light of the low sun, or is it a camera effect?   

   
Deer tracks to the compost.  

And it is suposed to stay cold for the next 10 days.