Archives for posts with tag: Koji

Another chickpea miso.

I had a bag of 900 grams rice koji and 400 grams of chickpeas, so all I needed was to get 500 grams more chickpeas and weigh up 414 grams salt, and I would have a 90% miso – 90% of the standard recipe.

Chickpea miso has sailed up as a good seller. It’s gluten free, soy free, and it has a very good flavor.

It grew fine is ready to dry.

Everytime I start a new koji season it takes a couple of batches to remember all the details, ticks, ideosyncrcies and tricks I use. This first batch of barley koji turned out fine tho, but it could have been slightly better.

I made my last rice koji a few days ago for this season. I have enough now for a couple more miso batches, sales and the fall season miso making. About 20 kilos in all.

Now I have to make barley and rye koji.

Yet another batch of barley miso. I’m making more than ever, because it already seems like I don’t have enough for this year. I should have made more 2 years ago.

I’m using the standard recipe, but the korn koji is a little different this time. I made it with some tane koji starter that was at least 30 years old. It seemed to grow fine but not as profusely as usual. I expect it will make a good miso tho.

The small jar is also an experiment. My wife was making some sourdough bread using caraway and fennel seeds for flavor, and I got the bright idea of adding some to the small amount of mix that was left. Lo and behold – caraway miso!

Or we will see 2 years from now.

Yesterday was the big Fermentation Day in Uppsala. All sorts of fermentation were represented.

We have been planning this since last year, and last week was one week of intense preparation. This event was modeled on the Fermentation Festival in Uddebo, which we have participated in the previous three years. The organisers in Uddebo wanted to take a break (and rest), so we felt we had to try doing it in Uppsala. Luckily an old friend Kent Wennman was equally enthusiastic. He has an event location as well as a great deal of experience in arranging events in Uppsala, so all the organising went smoothly. As it was our first time at this subject we worried that it could be a flop. On the other hand it could get out of hand. As it turned out it almost got out of hand, but went very well.

We planned to have good sales.

Photo; Joel Öhlund

When the doors opened, the crowd flowed in in a steady stream all day. I was surprised that so many were interested in miso and koji, and was so overwhelmed that I didn’t have time to take any good pictures.

I didn’t forget to hold my talk on how to make homemade miso and koji.

Photo; Finn Öhlund

We had 5 kinds of fermented vegetables, 6 kinds of miso and 3 types of koji. We thought we had a good supply of everything including extra jars of fermentations and packages, so we could package more on the spot, but alas we ran out early and should have had more.

It went so well, we are already talking about having another fermentation day soon.

Chickpea miso is very tasty.

It’s soybean free made with well cooked and ground chickpeas.

Using rice koji makes it gluten free as well.

I use the same standard recipe as for other 2 year misos. That is; 1 kilo beans, 1 kilo koji and 460 grams seasalt (well 459 grams).

With cooking water that makes nearly 5 kilos mix to ferment 2 years.

But good amazake.

I made 2 basic mistakes. I mixed in some old rice, and I steamed one portion twice as long as I should have. I always steam the rice about 20 minutes but got mixed up and cooked it twice. The old rice got a little soggy, and the double cooked got really soggy. I can probably save the properly cooked rice as koji, but the soggiest portion will have to be relegated to the desert corner. It is very sweet with a tinge of alcohol – amazake, so it can be eaten as candy now or be made into a desert. So bad turns good.

Now I’ll have to take a break and clean the equipment before starting up again.

Dried and packaged for later use.

And now the second batch is up drying, and the third batch is inoculated and in the incubator. It’s kind of like a conveyor belt operation, but with little hands on work. If the conditions are right the aspergillus mold grows very well on it’s own.

The first batch of koji was done last evening. The harvest was good and of good quality.

Now it’s spread out drying above the warm water pipes and the next batch is already in the incubator growing.

It’s growing very well.

It looks good – a nice powdery white color. It smells good – a sweet grapefruity, slightly sour aroma fills the room (and house). It tastes good – sweet like amazake. It has a good consistancy – it cakes together in one big clump, but breaks apart easily. The humidity factor is good – slighty dry especially on the surface and does not have any gooeyness.

Now to mix in air, and the dryer surface rice with the moister rice from the bottom and put it back in the heat cabinet (30 degrees C) for the last 12 hours.

In the meantime I’ll get ready for the next batch.