Archives for posts with tag: Market

Yesterday was the annual market at Järna outside Stockholm. We went not to sell but to soak in the atmosphere, meet friends and make some new contacts – like people into fermenting as well as ecological gardening.

At Skillebyholm the anthroposophy center of Sweden

Some more random pictures

An orderly lumber pile

Compost labeling

The immaculate herb garden

Real oregano

A dragon fly befriended me

More storage

The kitchen garden – beans

Tomatoes

Lots of good ideas and inspiration.

I met some fermenters too (but no pictures alas). I did get info to try to get them to come to Uppsala for the next Fermentation Festival in March next year.

The high point of the Pajala Market was, of course, the Rai Rai Band!

Yesterday was the big Fermentation Day in Uppsala. All sorts of fermentation were represented.

We have been planning this since last year, and last week was one week of intense preparation. This event was modeled on the Fermentation Festival in Uddebo, which we have participated in the previous three years. The organisers in Uddebo wanted to take a break (and rest), so we felt we had to try doing it in Uppsala. Luckily an old friend Kent Wennman was equally enthusiastic. He has an event location as well as a great deal of experience in arranging events in Uppsala, so all the organising went smoothly. As it was our first time at this subject we worried that it could be a flop. On the other hand it could get out of hand. As it turned out it almost got out of hand, but went very well.

We planned to have good sales.

Photo; Joel Öhlund

When the doors opened, the crowd flowed in in a steady stream all day. I was surprised that so many were interested in miso and koji, and was so overwhelmed that I didn’t have time to take any good pictures.

I didn’t forget to hold my talk on how to make homemade miso and koji.

Photo; Finn Öhlund

We had 5 kinds of fermented vegetables, 6 kinds of miso and 3 types of koji. We thought we had a good supply of everything including extra jars of fermentations and packages, so we could package more on the spot, but alas we ran out early and should have had more.

It went so well, we are already talking about having another fermentation day soon.

I still have a little barley and rye koji left from last years production, but no rice koji. Time to get busy. I’ll need some to sell at the Fermentation Day in Uppsala, and a lot to use for making miso and amazake throughout this year.

The first thing is to rinse and soak some rice.

While it’s soaking all day, I can clean the utensils and equipment.

We made a bunch more timchi (kimchi) of the sauerkraut type.

I’m runing out of fermentation jars (they’re all full), and I couldn’t find any the right size to buy, so I had to get one of my abandoned stoneware crocks out.

We are planning for a Fermentation Day in Uppsala, the second of March, at Håga, with market, workshops, talks, demonstrations, cafe etc. The crock full of timchi will be a nice eye catcher for my market stall.

More information about the Fermentation Day will be posted later. Or contact me with questions.

+1 C, rain and wind. I Took off early to head back home.

After the early morning drizzle cleared up the day turned out great.

Good weather, good crowd and good sales.

For many years now I have been helping with the Christmas dinners here at Djurby Gård, and not going to the Fyris Market until April, but this year no dinners, so I do the markets when the weather is good enough. Today is the first of advent and yesterday was the first of the popular advent markets. There are many holiday season markets all over the place. I probably should try some of the other markets, but I went to my usual Fyristorg Market. 



The weather was cold and windy and alot of people stayed home or were at other markets, and all I had was pumpkins and pickles, but sales were very good. 

The guy selling mistletoe.

We like Kobe too. 


It’s a nice town on the coast of the Pacific Ocean – a bit cheaper and more funky than Kyoto. We can stay here and still get to Kyoto easy and fast by train with a Japan Railways Pass. The best, tho, is that we have made some good friends here.
Our favorite place to stay, the Yume Nomad Hostel is here. We are now nested in here for the rest of our stay. 

It is inexpensive, quiet, artsy, and a great gathering place where you can meet like-minded travelers and locals in a laid-back and cozy atmosphere.

Our hosts (and old friends)


Then there is the traditional market Higashiyama Shotengai nearby to get lost in and find just about any thing under the sun, such as traditional japanese underware, an extra suitcase or tofu or lunch. 

Grilled mochi balls

Kabocha pumpkins
We buy our supplies for cooking meals at the hostel here. The best place to buy miso and pickled vegetables was still there, of course. And the family that runs the stall was so glad to see us again. 

Three years ago we met Bun, the coffee enthusiast, at Yume Nomad. Since then he has established himself in the business and moved to a new shop in down town Kobe near Sannomiya station. We got a great cup of ethiopian coffee and spent some time talking about coffee and old times. 


The Ikuta Jinga Shinto Temple was almost next door and demanded a visit. History has it that it was establised around 200 AD. It has been burnt down and destroyed in wars and natural disasters many times but always rebuilt. 


Now it still stands majestic amoung the high rise.