Archives for posts with tag: Stonework

The second warmth-of-the-sun accumulator for the grape ’solaris’ is finished.

I wish I’d known how easy and so much fun this is, when I was younger, I would have made a stone barrier all the way around the garden. To help keep critters out, and because I like the natural beauty of it.

Strong back weak mind!

My stone cove for the Rondo grape turned out pretty good.

I had a new grape to plant with no obvious place to put it so why not make another warm protective cove.

This one is called Solaris. It’s a green grape, good for white wine making and tasty as a table grape as well. It was developed for the colder climates of northern Europe.

There are always stones in this clay soil. Some are big and useful.

Like here for gathering warmth and mulching around this new planted Rondo grape plant.

This going to be piled higher – about a half a meter.

Some can be used as boarders too. There are so many uses.

I have a good supply that the farmer brings here from the fields around.

All shapes and sizes. For me and the farmer too, it’s like a pile of gold.

Barriers – keeping things in and others out – never work very well. However, they can look nice and facilitate mowing and digging. Doing stone work can be good excercise, if it doesn’t ruin my back.

I love stones and enjoy the work, and effect.

The stonework is finished, and I am very happy with this seasons progress. 

I even made a television. The very first permaculture TV set in the world, as far as I know. During fall storms I can sit in the conservatory by the pot belly stove and watch the war of the ants. 
  

But now it’s time to cover the stonewall work in progress, to keep it dry during the winter freeze.  

 

While the stone work is at a standstill because of the freezing nights, it’s been perfect weather for harvesting, cleaning out and turning over the soil. 

 
This crop circle is soon done and will be the pumpkin patch next summer. 

The stonewall is bedded in, waiting for warmer weather. If it doesn’t warm up, I’ll cover it over permenently for winter. Last year I did stone work until the end of October.   

 

No frost yet! That is good for the maize and pumpkins that are still ripening. 

But I’m getting close to the end of the stone building season. I may be able to keep doing stonework for another few weeks by covering over the fresh layer with a tarp when the temperaturs drop a few degrees below zero. 

A load of angular stones. 

  

Where the stones go. 

  

The weather has been unusually warm this October. There are lots of flowers and vegetables left in the garden, and the stone work could probably go on for a few more weeks, but I’m going to end it for this year, and start again when it warms up in spring. Today is another glorious fall day, and I did the final stretch of cementing this morning.

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I’m quite proud of my progress this year.

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It’s been so mild with only lite frosts that the tomatoes haven’t completely died yet.

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If the weather stays warm next week, I’ll mix up a little more fine cement and fill in the spaces between the new stones to polish it off.

The arch is coming along and looks pretty good.

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But it’s a lot more difficult than I expected. First, it’s harder to find stones with good angles so that they fit on all sides. And then the underside, which will be exposed later, is now hidden, so I can’t see what it will look like while building. I’m sure it will be quite a surprise when I take the form away.

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Not that I haven’t been working, but because of the heat and the garden party I’ve had my attention otherwhere. Now back to garden work and building. The stone wall has been neglected for about a month because of the hot weather. I want to make the arch and continue layering the stones.

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And get a half a meter done before winter sets in.