Archives for category: Food processing

I met a miso and koji enthusiast at the Fermentation Day recently. He came by yesterday to see how I do it. I scheduled the day so we could make miso and start a batch of barley koji while he was here.

First we made an herb miso with french soybeans (precooked the night before), barley koji, seasalt, basil, thyme, oregano and garlic.

We used the standard recipe with a deciliter each of the herbs. There was a small jar for him to take home.

We also made a batch of barley koji – steam cooked the barley, let it cool, then mixed in koji starter.

Then he returned home without seeing the mold grow for 2 days, but he did see the result of the previous batch, which we spread out to dry.

Another chickpea miso.

I had a bag of 900 grams rice koji and 400 grams of chickpeas, so all I needed was to get 500 grams more chickpeas and weigh up 414 grams salt, and I would have a 90% miso – 90% of the standard recipe.

Chickpea miso has sailed up as a good seller. It’s gluten free, soy free, and it has a very good flavor.

It grew fine is ready to dry.

Everytime I start a new koji season it takes a couple of batches to remember all the details, ticks, ideosyncrcies and tricks I use. This first batch of barley koji turned out fine tho, but it could have been slightly better.

I made my last rice koji a few days ago for this season. I have enough now for a couple more miso batches, sales and the fall season miso making. About 20 kilos in all.

Now I have to make barley and rye koji.

‘I should have made more 2 years ago.’ I’ve said that so many times. Now I’ve sold so much miso that it looks like I won’t have enough for this summers markets. And we are already planning for a new Fermentation Day in october. I am making more koji and miso now, but it won’t be ready in time, so I’ll have to make a couple more batches of 6 month miso to supplement the supply.

I’ll also make a 6 month miso with barley koji in june for the december markets.

Yet another batch of barley miso. I’m making more than ever, because it already seems like I don’t have enough for this year. I should have made more 2 years ago.

I’m using the standard recipe, but the korn koji is a little different this time. I made it with some tane koji starter that was at least 30 years old. It seemed to grow fine but not as profusely as usual. I expect it will make a good miso tho.

The small jar is also an experiment. My wife was making some sourdough bread using caraway and fennel seeds for flavor, and I got the bright idea of adding some to the small amount of mix that was left. Lo and behold – caraway miso!

Or we will see 2 years from now.

I figure I’ll be needing bigger and more batches of ‘sweet’ miso for the near future.

Based on 1 kilo of soybeans, I’ve calculated that I’ll need 1.1 kilo rice koji and only 200 grams seasalt for a larger amount of 1 year miso.

After washing, soaking, cooking (4 hours), cooling and grinding the soybeans, then mixing in the koji, grinding some more, mixing in the salt and putting it into tight jars, it’s ready for a 1 year ferment.

It should be done in time for next years Uppsala Fermentation Day if we have one at the same time as this year. However, Kent, the grandmaster this year, is already talking about doing it again this fall in October. I’ll have plenty of miso, I’m sure, but I’ll have to make a big batch of 6 month miso for that event too.

After the overwhelming fermentation day in Uppsala, things are getting back to normal. One thing I learned was that i will need to make more koji and miso

Rice koji growing well.

More rice miso to ferment.

Some of our best competition!

Bergslagens Gronsaksforadling

There was a very good article (in swedish) in the local newspaper Uppsala Nya Tidning about the fermentation day;

https://mobil.unt.se/nyheter/uppsala/bakterier-hett-i-uppsala-just-nu-5231494.aspx

Good text and more pictures.

Yesterday was the big Fermentation Day in Uppsala. All sorts of fermentation were represented.

We have been planning this since last year, and last week was one week of intense preparation. This event was modeled on the Fermentation Festival in Uddebo, which we have participated in the previous three years. The organisers in Uddebo wanted to take a break (and rest), so we felt we had to try doing it in Uppsala. Luckily an old friend Kent Wennman was equally enthusiastic. He has an event location as well as a great deal of experience in arranging events in Uppsala, so all the organising went smoothly. As it was our first time at this subject we worried that it could be a flop. On the other hand it could get out of hand. As it turned out it almost got out of hand, but went very well.

We planned to have good sales.

Photo; Joel Öhlund

When the doors opened, the crowd flowed in in a steady stream all day. I was surprised that so many were interested in miso and koji, and was so overwhelmed that I didn’t have time to take any good pictures.

I didn’t forget to hold my talk on how to make homemade miso and koji.

Photo; Finn Öhlund

We had 5 kinds of fermented vegetables, 6 kinds of miso and 3 types of koji. We thought we had a good supply of everything including extra jars of fermentations and packages, so we could package more on the spot, but alas we ran out early and should have had more.

It went so well, we are already talking about having another fermentation day soon.