Archives for category: Food processing

Mixed and ready for fermentation. 

Sometimes there’s a small amount that doesn’t fit and is put into a smaller jar. This time I added some garlic, ginger and fresh cayanne pepper, just to see/taste how it turns out. 


It will be good to have some miso ready for sales in september 2 years from now. 

Advertisements

I usually start my miso making season in november, but it looks like I may be running low already. So I soaked a kilo of soybeans and cooked them to make a batch of 2 year rice miso tomorrow morning. 

I have to look ahead 2 years based on the this falls sales. 

Today is the day for the yearly harvest festival market at Wik. 


Better than ever!

I picked some savoy cabbages to make some kimchi. They looked pretty bad because of all the pests eating away at them. It seamed like there wouldn’t be much kimchi, but after cleaning them, I found a lot that I could use. 


So along with the other ingredients, I made some. Most of the ingredients were from my garden, but I did have to buy some daikon radish and ginger. 

And it turned out to be quite a big batch. 


I made this jar of cucumber pickles last week. I didn’t notice that the rubber sealing ring broke, a lot of air flowed in and within a week the the mold grew profusely into a fluffy covering. If it had been a tiny bit of mold I could take it off, put on a new rubber ring and let it continue fermenting, but this is too much, and out to the compost it goes. My compost will love it!

It’s gone about 6 months since I made my first ever rye miso. One batch was a sweet miso – more rye koji, less salt and less time. I have opened it and  tasted it. 

And made a vegetable soup with it. 


Nice color and smell. It was, of course, a bit weak because of the short fermentaion time, but very tasty. It had the sweet-sour flavor of a good sweet miso, and the umame effect was great. Ot will be interesting to see and taste the development of the 1 year and 2 year miso versions. When the time comes. 

It’s time to start harvesting the ones that are getting big. Very nice, but before I cleaned them, they looked pretty bad because of the bugs.


We could eat them, or sell them, or better yet, save them for the future – make sauerkraut. 

And the one on the right has one chili pepper (cayanne) diced into it. 

The first bucket of cucumbers marks the start of a new pickling season. 


Along with dill, garlic, mustard seed, salt and water, everything is stuffed in the jar for fermentation. 

Today we made a new big batch of kimchi based on the age old sauerkraut method. It’s good and my customers really like it. 

We clean and shred savoy cabbages,

chop and dice garlic, sweet peppers and chili peppers,

shred ginger, carrots and radish,

pound the cabbage,

mix everything together and put it all into fermentation jars.

A package came today. 


2 packages of tane koji – one for rice koji and the other for barley koji. 


I ordered them about 2 weeks ago from:

Higuchi Matsunosuke Shoten Co., Ltd.

TEL:(81)06-6621-8781

FAX:(81)06-6621-2550

E-mail:koichi@higuchi-m.co.jp

URL:http://www.higuchi-m.co.jp/ 

It took a little longer this time, because I wasn’t familiar with japanese international banking practices. 2 years ago I ordered from Gem Cultures in the US and payed very easily using Paypal. Higuchi doesn’t have Paypal or such, so I had to figure out a new way. With banking information from Higuchi and help from my local bank it worked smoothly. 

Each of these packages is enough Aspergillus mold spores to enoculate 200 kilos of rice or barley, so it’s going to last me many years. This is the smallest amount they sell and probably too much for a home koji maker, but the price is very good, and the payment procedure is easy enough, so I can definitly recommend buying tane koji from them. They have a very good web site in english too.