Archives for category: Food processing

This week we make some special miso. A regular barley miso with herbs and a 2 year rice miso using small black soybeans (a heritage variety from what I understand).

The beans were boiled the usual 4 hours and left overnight, then ground and mixed with rice koji and salt as per my standard recipe.

Then packed and put away for fermentation.

The jars on the right are the barley herb miso, on the left is the small black soybean miso.

The first batch is done and ready for drying, while the next batch is inoculated and ready to put in the chamber.

It’s the second day (36 hours). The tane koji (starter) spores have long since germinated and the mycelium has grown so much that it has started to bind the rice corns into a cake.

The smell is right – delightfully sweet and fruity. The temperature is right after a slight adjustment, and the moisture, tho a little on the wet side, is OK. Now I’ll break up the clumps while adding air and put it into the heat chamber for another 12 hours.

At the same time the next batch of rice is washed and soaking for tonights steaming.

During the 48 hours of koji cultivation one must take care of it.

I open the heat chamber every morning and evening if not more often. I check the moisture (if the inoculated rice is getting too wet or too dry), the thermometer to make sure that the temperature is around 30 centigrade and then add air by paddling the mass back and forth a few times.

Then back into the warmth for a while.

I need some rice koji. I’ve already run out of that which I made this spring. So off to an early start.

Just inoculate steamed rice with good tane koji, and put it in the heat chamber for a couple of days.

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This weeks batch is a 2 year Rye Miso.

This time it was a little too much for the 2 jars, so I put the extra into a small jar with some chili peppers just for fun.

The other day I learned from a korean girl visiting that there are indeed innumerable ways to make kimchi. There are areas of Korea where they don’t put in chili powder and other areas where they don’t use fish sauce. My style of kimchi is just as valid as any other. She called mine a white kimchi.

So, I don’t have to call mine timchi anymore as if it’s not a proper kimchi – but I think I’ll call it timchi anyway.

This batch of timchi is with the ingredients cut into bite sized pieces.

Put into jars

And covered with a 3% salt water solution. In the end it becomes about 1.5%. Then it’s put it away for a proper fermentation.

Barley miso

2 years to wait

This week it is an herb miso.

Standard recipe for 2 year rice miso with garlic, basil, thyme and oregano added.

This week – rye miso made with rye koji.

And my new, stronger stick mixer.