Archives for category: Food processing

From our mangy prune tree we saved quite a load of prunes this year.

The bees and wasps and other bugs were there first and got probably half of the crop (good for them), but we got plenty. Alas, we managed to not get stung,

We cleaned and pitted them and made them into jam.

It’s put into containers then into the freezer.

For the rest of the year.

Sweet basil gets alot of protection and watering this year of the long hot summer and is growing like never before.

One of my favorite herbs, I need a lot. Along with thyme and oregano, it makes up my version of the herbs of provence, which I use it in my herb miso as well as a score of other recipes.

After a poor start at planting-out, the cucumber plants that survived have gotten established and are producing the first cucumbers ready for this years pickling.

Washed and pricked and put in the jar with garlic, dill flowers, and current leaves,

The amount of salt (1.5%) is very important and I have to think twice when calculating water and salt. Here I have a 3 liter jar, and I figure half cucumbers and half water – 1.5 liters water. Since half of the salt will osmose into the vegetables, I figure twice as much or 30 grams per liter water, making 45 grams salt for this batch. After osmosis this will result in 1.5% salt.

During the 4 week fermentation time, the lactic acid bacteria will proliferate and produce the acid, flavors and other good stuff.

The natural dill pickle!

While the garden is taking almost all of my time with the seeding, planting, weeding, cultivating, watering, harvesting and marketing, I must take some time for other stuff like making some more pickles before I run out (like 4 weeks before I run out). Last week we made a big batch of store bought eco carrots.

The other day we made a big batch of sauerkraut too.

I wonder if it all will last until I harvest my own carrots and cabbage in the fall?

I still have s couple of batches of miso to make before summer. Today it was an herb miso. Soybeans, rice koji, salt, garlic, thyme, oregano and basil.

It’s a frosty saturday morning, but the weather is supposed to get sunny and warm today. I told my customers that I would start going to the market as soon as the weather started to get nice, so I packed my backpack basket with fermented foods, lunch and other paraphernalia,

And hop on the bus to Uppsala and Fyristorg for my first farmers market this year.

Here we are – not much, but a good start.

The last batch of koji for this year is put out to dry.

I’ve gone through about 15 kilos barley, 10 kilos rye, and 16 kilos of rice turning it into koji. Some has already been made into miso, some has been sold, a little more will be made into miso and the rest will be saved to sell or make into miso in the fall.

The koji making season is over for this year. Now it is time to start planting seeds.

A couple weeks ago I reported on a koji that turned ugly, but not not bad. It had a good smell and taste. So now I made a miso with it to test it’s enzyme power, using the standard recipe.

I cooked 1 kilo of soybeans (there’s about 2 kilos of cooking liquid too).

1 kilo of ugly rice koji thoroughly ground in.

Then 460 grams seasalt mixed in.

Then put into fermentation jars to watch for 2 years. So far it looks just like it should.

My last batch of rice koji started to go gooey, so I spread it out in the wooden trays instead of the terracotta forms in order to air it out and dry it more. I don’t know why it went wrong, but I believe it’s because I mixed kinds of rice from 2 different sources and of differing quality. I noticed already after steaming that it looked off.

I succeeded it seems. After 2 days the smell and the taste were fine, and altho it didn’t look like it should, I put it out to dry and will use it later for a batch of miso.

This morning I started the fourth batch of rice koji.

Growth is good with the new package of starter (tane koji) from Higuchi.

Now I have a half kilo ready to send off to a costomer.