Archives for posts with tag: Miso

The koji looks pretty good after 2 days of growing.

This year I’m using tane koji starter from Higuchi. It’s the one they call ‘barley yellow koji’. This one sporulates yellow while the one I used last year from Gem Cultures sporulates green and more profusely. That will probably make this years barley miso a lighter color and perhaps a slightly different flavor. It will be interesting to watch it develop over the next two years. But first I have to dry the koji for later use.

Quickly, before the end of the year, I have to make another miso – a sweet white miso. This time I make it with already cooked eco soybeans, a greater proportion of rice koji and a lesser amount of salt, so that it will ferment faster and be ready after about 6 months.

The result – soon to be consumed.

The Toyoko Inn Hotel, adjacent to the Nagoya Airport, with the Dali Rhino in the entrance courtyard, was the last step in our Japan trip. 


It has an excellent japanese style breakfast,


complete with rice, vegetables, miso soup, pickles, natto and what else -Coffee!

We like Kobe too. 


It’s a nice town on the coast of the Pacific Ocean – a bit cheaper and more funky than Kyoto. We can stay here and still get to Kyoto easy and fast by train with a Japan Railways Pass. The best, tho, is that we have made some good friends here.
Our favorite place to stay, the Yume Nomad Hostel is here. We are now nested in here for the rest of our stay. 

It is inexpensive, quiet, artsy, and a great gathering place where you can meet like-minded travelers and locals in a laid-back and cozy atmosphere.

Our hosts (and old friends)


Then there is the traditional market Higashiyama Shotengai nearby to get lost in and find just about any thing under the sun, such as traditional japanese underware, an extra suitcase or tofu or lunch. 

Grilled mochi balls

Kabocha pumpkins
We buy our supplies for cooking meals at the hostel here. The best place to buy miso and pickled vegetables was still there, of course. And the family that runs the stall was so glad to see us again. 

Three years ago we met Bun, the coffee enthusiast, at Yume Nomad. Since then he has established himself in the business and moved to a new shop in down town Kobe near Sannomiya station. We got a great cup of ethiopian coffee and spent some time talking about coffee and old times. 


The Ikuta Jinga Shinto Temple was almost next door and demanded a visit. History has it that it was establised around 200 AD. It has been burnt down and destroyed in wars and natural disasters many times but always rebuilt. 


Now it still stands majestic amoung the high rise.

It was supposed to be rain, so instead of visiting Arashiyama we spent the day at Nishiki Market, a traditional in the main shopping district of Kyoto. 


Hundreds, maybe thousands of stalls selling traditional foods and stuff of old Japan. 

Here’s some pickled pumpkin


Or fresh wasabi


How about a snack of roasted mochi balls with miso or soysauce syrup



Matsutake mushrooms all the way from china


Pickled giant radish


Deep fried snacks


More pickles


Fresh pumpkins


Tofu and soy milk


And much much more.

We landed at Nagoya Airport and spent the good part of the rest of the day getting to Kyoto by slow bus which gave us another different view of Japan. 

After checking in at the ryokan, we spend the rest of the day killing time and jet lag at the Kyoto train station, one of the modern archetectural wonders of the world. 


And had dinner at our favorite restaurant there. Something I’ve been longing for since we discovered it 3 years sgo. 


Tempura on rice, miso soup, pickles and bancha tea. 

The third fermentation festival took place on saturday as usual in Uddebo. It was the best one ever.


This year I did 2 demonstrations – kimchi and miso. I was so busy I forgot to take some good pictures, only a few lousy ones. 

Like this presentation of infamous fermentations. 

Or this of Edvard Rödseth talking about beer making. 


Luckily Emma Persson got some very good pictures of my demonstration on kimchi making. 

And miso making. 

Mixed and ready for fermentation. 

Sometimes there’s a small amount that doesn’t fit and is put into a smaller jar. This time I added some garlic, ginger and fresh cayanne pepper, just to see/taste how it turns out. 


It will be good to have some miso ready for sales in september 2 years from now. 

I usually start my miso making season in november, but it looks like I may be running low already. So I soaked a kilo of soybeans and cooked them to make a batch of 2 year rice miso tomorrow morning. 

I have to look ahead 2 years based on the this falls sales. 

The second batch of rye koji is a great success too. 


That’s the last batch of koji for this year – 27 batches in all. Some have gone to making miso and amazake already, but there should be plenty left for more miso now and this fall, as well as for selling. And if I run out, I can always make more in december.