Archives for posts with tag: Fermentation

My version of kimchi! I started to run out of kimchi for sales, so had to make more. My own savoy and asian cabbages are not looking good after this summers drought and onslaught of bugs (they are looking better as the weather cools and it rains). So I had to go to the supermarket and get ingredients to complement my own garlic, carrots, peppers and chilis.

15 grams seasalt per kilo ingredients.

Presto – 15 kilos of vegies becomes 17 liters ready for fermentation.

Sweet basil gets alot of protection and watering this year of the long hot summer and is growing like never before.

One of my favorite herbs, I need a lot. Along with thyme and oregano, it makes up my version of the herbs of provence, which I use it in my herb miso as well as a score of other recipes.

After a poor start at planting-out, the cucumber plants that survived have gotten established and are producing the first cucumbers ready for this years pickling.

Washed and pricked and put in the jar with garlic, dill flowers, and current leaves,

The amount of salt (1.5%) is very important and I have to think twice when calculating water and salt. Here I have a 3 liter jar, and I figure half cucumbers and half water – 1.5 liters water. Since half of the salt will osmose into the vegetables, I figure twice as much or 30 grams per liter water, making 45 grams salt for this batch. After osmosis this will result in 1.5% salt.

During the 4 week fermentation time, the lactic acid bacteria will proliferate and produce the acid, flavors and other good stuff.

The natural dill pickle!

While the garden is taking almost all of my time with the seeding, planting, weeding, cultivating, watering, harvesting and marketing, I must take some time for other stuff like making some more pickles before I run out (like 4 weeks before I run out). Last week we made a big batch of store bought eco carrots.

The other day we made a big batch of sauerkraut too.

I wonder if it all will last until I harvest my own carrots and cabbage in the fall?

A couple weeks ago I reported on a koji that turned ugly, but not not bad. It had a good smell and taste. So now I made a miso with it to test it’s enzyme power, using the standard recipe.

I cooked 1 kilo of soybeans (there’s about 2 kilos of cooking liquid too).

1 kilo of ugly rice koji thoroughly ground in.

Then 460 grams seasalt mixed in.

Then put into fermentation jars to watch for 2 years. So far it looks just like it should.

We had a gang over to study kimchi making. The youthful enthusiasin turned it into a great party.

We made 2 kinds of kimchi – sauerkraut style and chunky style, and turned about 25 kilos of vegetables into many jars of kimchi.

Lots for everybody to take home.

Inspiring and tiring.

The first batch of barley koji made with the Gem Cultures starter.

Compare this with the barley koji made with Higuchi starter.

Not much difference, but here’s a close up of the first

And the latter

The Gem Culture starter produces a greener koji, and it has a stronger sporulation, which can produce quite a cloud when harvesting and using.

Be careful!

I’ve done 8 batches of barley koji so far this year. The last ones started to show signs of a little bacteria growth – wet spots in the wood of the growing trays and a slight change in the smell. So, I skip a batch and clean the trays. After a thourogh scrub and rinse (no detergent) I sometimes put them in the oven at 100 degrees C for an hour.

Then start a new batch.

I have made the first 8 batches with the yellow barley tane koji from Higuchi. Now I’ll make some with barley tane koji from Gem Cultures to see the difference. There should be a diff in sporulation and color.

Later I’ll make 2 parallell batches of barley miso with the 2 kinds of koji for comparison.

Actually it’s 100% miso, of course.

But I only had 800 grams rice koji left from last years production, so that’s 80% from my standard recipe for 2 year miso, which is:

  • 1 kilo soybeans
  • 1 kilo koji
  • 460 grams seasalt

So this time it was 800 grams each of beans and koji, 370 grams salt and put into a 4 liter jar.

Some good old fashioned 2 year barley miso. Ready for fermentation.

My favorite!

This batch is made with 1 kilo of new freshly grown and dried barley koji, along with 460 grams seasalt and 1 kilo of eco soybeans from China. I’m still looking for a new source of soybeans grown in Sweden.